Soul Stroll for Health Resources

 

HEALTH FACT SHEETS

Bone Marrow Transplants
Breast Cancer
Cardiovascular disease
Diabetes
Glaucoma
HIV/AIDS
Kidney Disease
Lupus
Prostate Cancer
Tobacco
Violence

 

TOPICS
Who gets Lupus?
What is Lupus?
Common signs or systemic Lupus
Diagnosis and treatment
 

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WHO GETS LUPUS?

Lupus is a serious health problem that mainly affects young women. Most people with Lupus first get it as teenagers or as young adults. People of all races may get Lupus. However, black women are three times more likely to develop lupus than white women.

You cannot catch Lupus from someone else. You cannot give Lupus to someone else. Lupus is not cancer. It is not AIDS.

WHAT IS LUPUS?

In Lupus, something goes wrong with the body’s immune system, and this powerful protective system is no longer able to defend the body against illness. Lupus may affect the joints, the skin, the kidneys, the lungs, the hearts, or the brain.

There are Three Types of Lupus:

Systemic Lupus erythematosus the most serious form of Lupus, which may harm the skin mouth, kidneys, brain, lungs, and heart.
Lupus that mainly affects the skin (discoid or cutaneous lupus).
Lupus caused by medications (drug-induced lupus), which goes away when the medication is stopped.


COMMON SIGNS OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS:

Red rash or color change on the face, often in the shape of a butterfly across the bridge of the nose.
Painful or swollen joints.
Unexplained fever.
Chest pain with breathing.
Unusual loss of hair.
Pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress.
Sensitivity to the sun.
Low blood count.

These signs are more important when they occur together.

Other signs of lupus can include mouth sores, unexplained fits or convulsions, hallucinations, or depression; repeated miscarriages; and unexplained kidney problems.

Signs of Lupus can include mouth sores, unexplained fits or convulsions, hallucinations, or depression; repeated miscarriages, and unexplained kidney problems.

Signs of lupus tend to come and go. There are times when the disease quiets down or goes into remission. At other times lupus flares up or become active.

 

DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT:

Only a doctor can diagnose lupus. If you think you or someone you know has Lupus, see a doctor may prescribe a variety of medications for the Lupus patient.
If you have Lupus, you may need extra rest. Try to avoid stressful situations, and stay out of the sun. Some people should avoid sunlight because it may worsen the disease.
We do not know what causes Lupus, but researchers are looking for a cure. Researchers also are improving ways to detect and treat the disease.

 

 

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